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MAP testing

Welcome to the MAP Testing page


We hope the following list of frequently asked questions will help you learn more about our use of MAP tests.

Questions

1) What are Measures of Academic Progress, or MAP tests?
2) What are computerized adaptive tests?
3) How often can a student be tested?
4) Do all students in the same grade take the same test?
5) What type of scores is reported on NWEA MAP assessments?
6) What is the RIT scale?
7) What grades are MAP tests applicable?
8) How do MAP tests tie in with local curriculum?
9) Can students with special needs take MAP tests?
10)How can parents understand MAP results for students? 

Answers

         
  1)

 

What are Measures of Academic Progress, or MAP tests?  
  A

 

MAP assessments are adaptive achievement tests in Mathematics, Reading, and Language Usage that are taken on a computer.  
         
  2)   What are computerized adaptive tests?  
  A   Computerized adaptive tests are taken on a computer. The difficulty of a test is adjusted to the student's performance so each student sees different test questions. The difficulty of each question is based on how well the student has answered the questions up to that point. As the student answers correctly, the questions become more difficult. If the student answers incorrectly, the questions become easier.  
         
  3)   How often can a student be tested?  
  A   Districts have the option of testing their students up to four times a year. Students typically take tests at the beginning of the school year and at the end of the school year. Some districts may also choose to test students in winter and summer.  
         
  4)   Do all students in the same grade take the same test?  
  A   No. The computer adjusts the difficulty of the questions so that each student takes a unique test.  
         
  5)   What type of scores is reported on NWEA MAP assessments?  
  A   Percentile scores 
Achievement scores 
Growth scores
 
         
  6)   What is the RIT scale?  
  A   The scale NWEA uses to measure a student's progress is called the RIT scale, short for Rasch Unit. The RIT scale is an equal-interval scale much like centimeters on a meter stick. It is used to chart a student's academic growth from year to year.  
         
  7)   What grades are MAP tests applicable?  
  A   In general, students in grades 3 through 10 take MAP tests because the tests are grade independent, they may be appropriate for students in lower or higher grades. NWEA is completing the development of tests for early primary grade students.  
         
  8)   How do MAP tests tie in with local curriculum?  
  A   MAP tests are aligned to the content and structure of state standards.  
         
  9)   Can students with special needs take MAP tests?  
  A   Because the tests are adaptive and un-timed, they often are appropriate for special needs students.  
         
  10)   How can parents understand MAP results for students?  
  A   Click on the attachment (PDF) to learn how to interpret MAP results for students. (Bottom of the Page)  
         

 

Grade Level to be tested 2013 - 2014:

Grade 1:  English Language Arts, Mathematics
Grade 2:  English Language Arts, Mathematics
Grade 3:  English Language Arts, Mathematics
Grade 4:  English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science
Grade 5:  English Language Arts, Mathematics
Grade 6:  English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science
Grade 7:  English Language Arts, Mathematics
Grade 8:  English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science

High School:

English I, English II
Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry
U.S. History, U.S. Government
Biology

 

How can I tell if my child is being successful?

Your child's results will be sent to you the fall after the test that was given.  The test is scored (or graded) according to four achievement levels:  Below Basic, Basic, Proficient, and Advanced.  Missouri's goal is to help students achieve in the top two categories.

 

How can I help my child to perform well on the MAP assessment?

  Tip #1:   Read, Read, Read!  
      Reading takes skill and practice.  One of the best and simplest steps to improve the reading ability for children is to provide sustained periods of time for children to read.  
         
  Tip #2:     Help your child to read like a writer.  
      Even in the early grades, children can begin to "get into the head" of the author.  Reading improves a child's writing, and writing improves a child's reading.  
         
  Tip #3:     Read a variety of books and magazines.  
     

MAP English Language Arts test contains short stories, poems, dialogues, magazine articles, charts and tables.  Children need to be able to read a wide variety of texts ranging from road signs to restaurant menus, comic books to classics, and from tennis shoe ads to computer manuals.

 
         
  Tip #4:   Build your child's reading stamina.  
      To build reading stamina, you may wish to encourage your child to increase gradually the amount of time she reads at one sitting.  Include short breaks, such as stretching or closing her eyes for a minute.  Set individual reading goals based upon doing the "best that she can."  
         
  Tip #5:   Teach your child that visuals are part of the text.  
      Students are often required to gather information from photos, captions, drawings, charts, and graphs.  You can help by teaching your child to look at all of these materials as part of the total text.  
         
  Tip #6:     Help your child know how to use text-based support in written responses.  
      Most of the constructed-response items on the MAP assessments have two parts or require children to explain or show how they arrived at their answers.  Children will receive only partial credit for answers to questions that are not supported with specific details or that do not contain an explanation.  
         
  Tip #7:   Teach your child to preview the test before starting.  
      Planning the test time will allow your child to pace himself while he is working and decrease stress.  
         
  Tip #8:     Teach your child to identify all parts of a question.  
      Teach your child to identify exactly what each question is asking.  Some questions have multiple parts, which are often combined into a single sentence with a single question mark at the end.  The child should underline each question word (who, what, when, where, why, how and any other word or phrase that indicates a question).  By doing so, she can see if a question has multiple parts.  Not answering all parts of a multi-part question is a common error.  
         
  Tip #9:   Teach your child to paraphrase test items, turning questions into statements.  
      Teach your child to turn questions into statements. The child may underline the question words as described above, and then turn each part of the item into a statement.  For example, the question, "Why did the main character play with the ball?" could be rephrased as "The main character played with the ball because ..."  This practice allows the child to phrase the question in a way that makes the most sense to him.  He is then ready to read the passage and look for answers.  
         
  Tip #10:     What can a parent or guardian do to ensure successful assessment for their student?  
     
  • Be aware of the testing schedule.
  • Be certain that your child has had adequate rest (this may mean getting them used to an earlier bed time before the week of testing).
  • Be on time for school.
  • Avoid scheduling appointments that can be done at a later date.
  • Dress your child in layered clothing.  This way, the child may add clothing to get warmer or remove some clothing to be cooler.
  • If your school allows it, make sure your child has a book to read when the testing session is complete.
  • Be certain that your child has two or more number two pencils (not mechanical).
  • Have a positive attitude.
 
         

 

 

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